Tag Archives | pet first aid

Ruffwear to the Rescue for Arden and Her Pets’ 2,800-mile Road Trip

As The Pet Health and Safety Coach, I spend a lot of time on the road with Pet Safety Cat Casey and Pet Safety Dog Kona. Occasionally, Cleo, my 14-year-old retired K9 surfer, joins us. For all of us who travel with our pets, one way to stay sane –and safe — is to pack the right pet essentials.

So, on a recent five-week, 2,800-mile round trip from Dallas to San Diego where we conducted several pet behavior and pet first aid classes, I made sure that my SUV contained these two Ruffwear products:

  • The Ruffwear Haul Bag Water-resistant and roomy with a sturdy zipper, this pet travel bag easily held all the pet food, leashes, doggy potty bags, grooming wipes and favorite toys for my four-legged travel mates. It was the ideal size and didn’t take up a lot of cargo space. And, I used its outside pockets to stash items I needed to need quickly: doggy bags, bag of treats, bottled water and collapsible water bowl. Keeping all the pet stuff in one bag made transporting luggage into the hotel rooms each night so much more convenient
  • The Ruffwear Hydro Plane High-Floating Disc: To break up the monotony during those long road trips, I made sure to pack Kona’s favorite toy — this durable, lightweight disc. Kona is a two-year-old Jack Russell terrier mix who needs –and deserves — to s-t-r-e-t-c-h her legs and engage in mini-play sessions during road trips. Each time we found a safe place for her to run, I would hurl the Hydro Plane in the air and watch with amusement as Kona sprinted, leaped to catch it and then wrestle it to the ground with great glee. I like that this disc is gentle on her mouth and can even float for times when we are at dog-friendly beaches.

To learn more about these and other quality Ruffwear products, click here. And, to book us to come to your group to teach pet first aid classes or give dog/cat behavior talks, contact Arden Moore at arden@fourleggedlife.com.

Gotta go — it’s time for Kona, Casey and I to hit the road again!

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Pet Safety Cat Casey and Pet Safety Dog Kona make sure that I have packed treats for them inside this Ruffwear Haul Bag.

 

Kona patiently awaits another toss by me of the Ruffwear Hydro Plane.

Kona patiently awaits another toss.

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Nap time is ah…..so great in a TrustyPup Bed

You know the saying, “Let sleeping dogs lie.” Well, in our pet household, nap time is a prized activity among Kona, Cleo and Jeanne, who range in age from two to 14. Sure, we have sofas and beds, but this Terrific Terrier Trio delighted in taking turns snoozing in the comfy Remedy Rest Deluxe Memory Foam Pet Bed made by TrustyPup.

Need evidence? Just check out this series of photos showcasing each dog’s desire to circle, plop and snooze in this bed that features cushions that ease achy joints and conforms to each dog’s shape. Nice!

Other pluses: TrustyPup beds come in various sizes, the covers are machine washable and the beds are not only functional, but eye-appealing as well. With the holidays approaching, treat your favorite canine to one of these beds now available at Walmart, Target, Krogers and online at Amazon.com. And learn more by visiting its Facebook Page. It’s nap time!

 

 

 

Sweet Jeanne plops and sprawls in the TrustyPup bed.

Sweet Jeanne plops and sprawls in the TrustyPup bed.

Pet Safety Dog Kona is the first to discover the TrustyPup bed

Pet Safety Dog Kona is the first to discover the TrustyPup bed

Miss Cleo, a young 14-year-old, is deep into dreamland in the TrustyPup bed.

Miss Cleo, a young 14-year-old, is deep into dreamland in the TrustyPup bed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maddie patiently waits her turn in the TrustyPup bed occupied by Gracie.

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Solving Litter “Confetti” on Floor Thanks to Drymate Litter Trapping Mat

Ever face a challenge that seems like one piece of the solution is missing?  That has been my fate since I moved from Oceanside, CA to Allen, TX when it comes to maintaining a tidy bathroom for Pet Safety Cat Casey.

Casey is an orange tabby with a growing reputation as the country’s only active (and willing) feline “instructor” who teams up with Pet Safety Dog Kona and I to conduct veterinarian-approved, hands-on pet first aid/CPR and safety classes through our Pet First Aid 4U program.

He sports a bowtie at events and unleashes the charm of a feline George Clooney to everyone of every age he meets. His purr machine seems to be on low throttle. Check him out performing his sit-and-paw greeting to a young kid attending the SPCA of Texas summer camp.

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Yes, Casey sports smarts and good manners — until it is time to use the litter box. He seems to thrive in spreading the litter like confetti all over my wooden floor. That brings me back to the “challenge” I identified in the beginning of this post. I found myself constantly bringing out my handheld vacuum to suck up the long trail of litter.

In addressing this issue, I first switched out the litter boxes from an open box to one with a dome lid. He must walk up a miniature set of stairs to enter the spot inside to do his “business.” And, to prevent any odors, I now use Litter Genie, a cat litter disposable system that resembles a baby’s diaper disposal that enables me to scoop of the litter clumps into it, drop it down into a plastic bag and put a lid on it to prevent any odors from escaping.

Still nagging me, however, was how to conquer the litter scattered all over the floor. I tried a plastic litter mat that was sticky and ugly and it woefully failed into containing the litter coming off Casey’s paws each time he exited the litter box. Plus, it had a slippery backing, enabling Casey to knock it all over the floor and far from the litter box.

Then I heard about a new product called the Drymate Litter Trapping Mat when I was attending the BlogPaws/Cat Writers Association conference held outside of Phoenix, AZ. The manufacturer sent me a pair of mats to test.

I placed down the 28-by-36-inch gray mat down on my wooden floor in front of Casey’s litter box about a month ago. And I am happy to report that there is little to NO litter littering my floor anymore. I also like that this mat is comfortable to walk on bare feet and comes in an attractive soft charcoal color. Made of 100-percent polyester fiber, it features ridges that safely pull litter from your cat’s paws and traps any liquid as well. Check out this pic of Casey displaying (finally) good litter box exiting etiquette:

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Here are other reasons why the Drymate Litter Trapping Mat earns my high “paws up” approval:

  • Cleaning is a breeze. You can easily vacuum or shake off litter into a garbage bag.
  • It can be cleaned in the washer machine or by hand. Just allow it to air dry.
  • It is environmentally friendly. The mats are made from recycled plastic bottles.
  • The backing is waterproof and slip resistant.

closeup of material with mat

 

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As The Pet Health and Safety Coach, a pet behavior consultant and host of the Oh Behave Show on Pet Life Radio, I am constantly approached about recommending pet products. But I am very choosy – after all, it is my reputation on the line. However, I have no hesitation in recommending you resolve your “litter confetti” syndrome by getting your paws on the Drymate Litter Trapping Mat. It is available at Target stores with retail prices of $19.99 for the 28-by-36 size and $12.99 for the 20-by-28 size. To learn more, visit its site by clicking here.

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Learn Arden Moore’s “Mutt-gyver” Pet First Aid Tactics

Dogster cover

Dogster is the revamped Dog Fancy magazine that caters to the needs of 21st century dogs. I urge you to fetch yourself a copy by clicking here. And, as a special treat, here is the feature I wrote for this issue:

As a master certified pet first aid instructor and the delighted pet parent to a pair of canines named Chipper and Cleo, I’m all about doing my best to keep them out of harm’s way.

Like many of you, I keep a well-stocked pet first aid kit in my home as well as a smaller version in my SUV. When we’re off on a long mountain hike or other outdoor doggy adventure, I pack a mini-pet first aid kit.

But even the most conscious of pet parents among us does not tote a pet first aid kit around 24-7. The sad reality is that injuries and illnesses in our dogs can occur any place, any time – and usually when our pet first aid kit is not nearby.

So, what do you do when your dog gets stung by a bee or cuts his paw on a walk in your neighborhood or suddenly collapses and stops breathing in your living room?

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Don’t panic. Help is here. In my classes taught all around the country, I not only train people on the pet first aid basics (like rescue breathing, performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, stopping arterial bleeds and more), but also how to unleash their creative “Mutt-gyvers” inside of them. By that, I refer to how to use everyday household items to stabilize and immobilize your dog until he can be safely transported to a veterinary clinic for professional treatment.

Mutt-gyver is my playful canine twist that refers to (and pays homage to) that action-adventure television show of the late 1980s and early 1990s called MacGyver. The show’s hero, Angus MacGyver, relied on his Swiss Army knife, duct tape, shoelaces and other common items within reach to escape from and foil bad guys each episode.

It’s time we used that same “think-outside-the-box” MacGyver mindset when it comes to rendering emergency pet first aid for our dogs. So, here are some situations and common items you may be wearing or have within reach to use as makeshift pet first aid tools:

Dialing in the many safety features of your cell phone. In addition to taking a hands-on pet first aid class, I encourage you to download a pet first aid app to your cell phone today. Your cell phone is your No. 1 pet first aid tool. The app can provide step-by-step guidance to stabilize your dog. And during a serious emergency, such as if your dog has stopped breathing, you can perform CPR and talk to the nearest veterinarian via the speakerphone setting. Always alert the nearest veterinary clinic that you are en route and your ETA arrival so that they can prepare an exam room. Remember, in a serious pet emergency, every minute counts!

Safely restraining your injured dog. Even the mellowest of mutts can bite when in pain, so heed Pet First Aid Rule #1: protect yourself first before rendering care. The 6-foot nylon leash can be used as a muzzle restraint to prevent your injured dog from being able to open up his mouth wide enough to bite you. This restraint enables him to still breathe.

The key is to form a noose and make the first tie on the bridge of your dog’s nose. Next, tie under the chin, then tie on the back of the neck below the ears and finish by threading one end under the first tie on the bridge of the nose looped back to the top of the head where you tie it in a bow (never a knot) Please see the photo of my dog, Chipper, sporting this makeshift leash muzzle restraint.

Other Mutt-gyver restraint options: For smaller dogs, you can use the drawstring from a hooded sweatshirt or your sneaker shoelace as a temporary muzzle. Belts may work in some circumstances. For dogs with short muzzles, like pugs, boxers and some pit bulls, consider restraining by rolling a thick bath towel around their necks and grip the ends behind their heads, lifting slightly up to prevent them from being able to open their mouths wide.

Muttgyver4

Administering to cut paws. Here’s a lesson I learned a couple years ago when I was on a 6-mile hike with friends and their dogs. A 60-pound dog in our group named Katie badly cut her front paw midway through the hike. She was too heavy to lift on the rocky terrain for the three miles back to our base camp. So, I cleaned her paw with bottled water, used a bandana to apply pressure to stop the bleeding and left the folded bandana on the wound. I then wrapped her paw in a white crew sock (you could also wrap the paw in an unused plastic doggy bag) and tied it snugly using a friend’s hair tie. We were able to safely usher Katie back to camp and then on to the veterinary clinic for professional treatment.

Other Mutt-gyver options: If your dog badly strains or breaks his leg on an outing, limit his movement to prevent him from putting any weight on the injured limb. After applying a restraint muzzle, you can make a makeshift splint by using paint stirrers or Popsicle sticks as splints and wrapping the limb in a water bottle, newspapers or a magazine held in place with shoelaces or a bandana. Dogs too heavy to lift can be placed on your sweatshirt and dragged or carried in a sweatshirt sling.

Treating bee or wasp stings. Bees, in particular, are driven creatures on pollinating missions. During the heat of the day, they often scurrying from low-level flowers and ground covers. You can reduce your dog’s chance of being stung by steering them away from ground cover on your leashed walks and making sure your dog heeds the “come back” cue from you so he doesn’t inadvertently poke his nose in a bee hive unleashed on a hike.

If you can see the stinger, slide the edge of your credit card or driver’s license against the stinger to usher it out. (Please refer to the photo of my dog, Cleo, going belly up to have me practice on removing a pretend stinger from her belly via my credit card.) Do not use tweezers or your fingernails to attempt to remove the stinger, because you will risk rupturing the poison sac. Keep your dog calm and take him to the veterinary clinic if the area swells and he develops breathing difficulties. If you do have an antihistamine available to give your dog, make sure that the only ingredient is diphenhydramine.

* Treating your dog who gets too hot or too cold. Unlike us, dogs perspire through their paws. On superhot days, keep your dog cool by dipping his paws in cool water. You can pour bottled water into your baseball cap if necessary. On cold days, coat your dog’s paws in petroleum jelly to prevent ice crystals or salt from cutting the paws. And heed the motto to “hug, not rub” to warm your dog who may suffer from frostbite. Place a small dog inside your winter coat to gradually warm up from your body heat. Wrap a large dog in a Mylar blanket, that lightweight shiny blanket that marathon runners and campers use to retain heat.

Household items checklist
Here’s a rundown of everyday items that can be used in a pet first aid situation when the kit is not available:
• 6-foot nylon leash
• Bath towel
• Sneaker shoelaces
• Mylar blanket
• Bottled water
• Baseball cap
• Your credit card or driver’s license
• Your bandana
• Your sweatshirt
• Thick magazine and/or newspaper
• Unused plastic doggy bag
• Your cell phone (with a pet first aid app)

Share some of your “Mutt-gyver” pet safety ideas! Email me at arden@fourleggedlife.com.

And, contact me about teaching veterinarian-approved, hands-on pet first aid/CPR/safety to you and your group. I often am accompanied by Chipper and Casey (my tolerant dog-cat teaching assistants) and we conduct in-service training for pet-related businesses as well as to the general public. Learn more by visiting my pet first aid site by clicking here.

 

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In Tribute to Zeki the Cool Cat

ZekiAtTheMikeSmallSize

Dear Friends:

Zeki the Cool Cat, who miraculously survived being skinned with a hunting knife as a sweet stray to become a certified therapy pet and a very tolerant pet first aid demo cat, crossed over into feline heaven on Saturday. Though she didn’t quite make her sixth birthday, she accomplished much in her short life.

In her travels with me, I observed that she never seemed to have met a stranger or felt like she was in a strange place. She would enter a hotel room and confidently leap up on the king-sized bed and find a comfy spot to snooze after a long drive. She traveled by car and by plane, visiting people in eight states.SuperZooZekiWithFamousSkateboardBulldogTillmanAndRonDavis

Zeki partnered with me as co-keynote speakers at the Pet Sitters International conference in North Carolina; me-WOWed attendees at Blog Paws in Las Vegas, met canine celebrities like Tillman the Bulldog while sampling products at Super Zoo and even helped me open a dog park in Carlsbad, Calif. And during two Cat Writers Association conferences, she plopped in a cushiony chair – sans a leash — to meet and greet old and new friends and even attend a couple happy hours.

Among our favorite memories:

* Enjoying a “date” with Jackson Galaxy, host of “My Cat from Hell” on Animal Planet. He describes Zeki as “My Kitty from Heaven.” ZekiLicketyStikJackson

* Playfully “crashing” a book signing event for dogs and dog lovers for Dr. Marty Becker, on a national tour for the release of his latest dog book.

* Wowing Victoria Stilwell, dog trainer extraordinaire, at the Del Mar pet expo where we were all featured speakers. As she held a calm Zeki in her arms while circled by a pack of confused canines Victoria declared: “This is the best cat ever!”

* Bringing joy to a terminally ill gentleman in a wheelchair whose sister brought him to a national cat show in Del Mar to specifically meet Zeki, who was giving pet first aid demos. Ignoring all the loud speaker announcements and the throngs of people, Zeki calmly sat on this man’s lap and purred for more than 30 minutes. As he stroked Zeki’s soft coat, he began to speak softly to her and smile.

* Meeting Hall of Fame pitcher Orel Hershiser at SuperZoo. He was autographing baseballs to admirers and personalized one for Zeki and commented: “I do believe this is the first time I autographed a baseball for a cat.” Zeki showed no outward excitement.

* Tracking down a sweet senior named Edwina in Dallas with the help of Zeki’s foster parent, Dusty Rainbolt. Edwina and her sons heard painful cries from under a porch and discovered a bloodied Zeki after being attack with a hunting knife. Despite being on a fixed income, she wrote a check for $1,000 to help toward’s Zeki’s medical bills. Zeki and I were able to present her with flowers and thank her in person a few years later. ZekiMeetsEdwinaJan2013

* Hanging out at home with the other members of our Furry Fab Four: dogs, Chipper and Cleo and her older feline sib, Murphy — with regular visits from her canine cousins: Stanley, Buddy, Jeanne, Maddie and Gracie.

I have had cats all my life, but Zeki was special in so many ways to so many people, cats and yes, even dogs. This petite Turkish Van mix had a special way of bringing joy out in others, including a few who confessed that they “never liked” or “never really understood” cats until they met Zeki — and they looked forward to each time they got together with her.

For the past few months, Zeki’s health declined. She lost weight, became blind and then had difficulty breathing. We made frequent trips to our veterinarian, consulted veterinary specialists. Despite ultrasounds, comprehensive and repeated blood and urine testing, various medications and lots of love and prayers, we could never pin down what she had. Lymphoma, rabbit fever and histoplasmosis were among the top contenders behind her mystery disease. Please forgive me for not posting her medical woes publicly as it has been a very emotional roller coaster ride for me and my pets.  We were blessed to have a core of friends during this time, including Dr. Lorie Huston, Nedra Abramson, Jocelyn Shannon, Mark Winter, Cathy Conheim, Dan St. James, Flo Frum, Jill James, and my family – Deb, Kevin, Karen, Alicia, Chrissy and Andy.

My ache due to her passing is beyond words. So, I try to focus on the gift that was — and always will be — Zeki. I selected that Turkish name because it translates to “clever and courageous.” She was both. Zeki loved, loved, loved deli turkey and knew a fresh supply was always in the refrigerator where she would “guide” me often.

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She drew admiration and astonishment from many of our pet first aid students due to her leaping up on the demo table on cue, permitting strangers to brush her teeth, check her capillary refill and wrap her in a towel like a purr-ito. She taught classes in yoga studios, homes and even dog boarding kennels and never hissed once at a dog startled to see a cat in a canine hangout. And forever in my class presentations will be a short video clip of her doing chest compressions on a stuffed demo dog to illustrate that even cats know how to perform CPR.

Some cats live nine lives. Zeki lived 18 lives– plus. She taught me many life lessons, including to live in the Me-NOW. For those of you fortunate to have a special pet in your life — the one we refer to as “heart dogs” or “heart cats,” remember to celebrate each and every day you get to spend with them on this planet.

Sending hugs, tail wags and purrs,

Arden, Chipper, Cleo, Murphy and our new kitten, Casey

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BlogPaws Bound with Zeki the Pet Safety Cat!

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When you have cool cat with an important pet safety message, you must travel. And, this week, Zeki and I are making the road trip to Las Vegas where we will speak and give pet first aid demos at the must-attend BlogPaws conference.

Now, the thought of making a five-hour drive with a cat may not sound like it would make your Top 10 list of favorite things to do, but Zeki frequently travels with me by car and by plane to assist in my pet first aid and pet behavior talks. We are very excited to attend our first BlogPaws and mingle with some of the top two- and four-leggers in the pet industry. We look forward to seeing long-time friends like Janiss Garza (of Sparkle the Designer Cat blog fame), Tina Martinez of the Morris Animal Foundation as well as finally getting to meet the multi-talented blogger Carol Bryant and business savvy Shawna Schuh, president and chief pet wrangler of Women in the Pet Industry (to which I happily belong).

As many of you know, Zeki is a former Dallas stray who survived a brutal knife skinning and now is a certified therapy cat with Pet Partners (formerly the Delta Society) and the first feline of pet first aid. Zeki is a confident cat who lives in the Me-NOW. Please check out her adventures by liking her Facebook page – Zeki the Cool Cat. She also lives for turkey treats! I have tried, without success, to convince her that there are NO turkey-payout casinos in Vegas. She has her feline sights set on winning a big turkey jackpot. I think I heard her meowing about it being like Thanksgiving every day. TDZekiH🙂

Zeki and I will have a booth with a pet first aid/Pet Life Radio show theme.  Each week, I host the Oh Behave Show on Pet Life Radio, the No. 1 pet radio network on the planet!  Look for Zeki and I to give a mini pet first aid demo to attendees at 2 p.m. Thursday (May 8) followed up by a fun dog party demo at 4:30 p.m. Yep, one of the many ‘collars’ I wear in the pet world is founder of National Dog Party Day. Dogs and their people get to revel in the moment, raise money for grrr-eat pet charities and learn some fun new canine games. This year, we are expanded NDPD and will be unleashing details on how you can host a party in your community soon. But mark the dates: National Dog Party Day will be celebrated the weekend of Sept. 13-14 – you pick the date/time that weekend that works best for you!

Our big talk comes Saturday (May 10) from 3:45-5:15 p.m. where we will give a hands-on, veterinarian-approved pet first aid class. We welcome people who want to be their pet’s best health ally and we welcome well-mannered dogs. Zeki loves teaming up with d-o-g-s in our pet first aid classes. We have fun and I will ‘reveal’ why every pet first aid kit should have an orphaned white sock, sneaker shoelaces and an Ikea plastic carryout bag!

PFA2114ZekiClassRedMuzzles2The pet first aid class is a sneak peek at the full classes we offer as part of Pet Tech, the world’s premiere leader in pet first aid training. As a master instructor, I travel all over North America (often with Zeki and sometimes, my dog, Chipper). Students earn two-year certification in pet first aid. I customize classes for professional pet groups: pet sitters, boarding kennel staff, vet techs, dog walkers and more. Find out more by sniffing around my Pet First Aid 4 U site.

Whew! It’s time to pack! Zeki and I hope to meet you in purr-son at BlogPaws!

 

 

 

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Arden and her dog-cat pet first aid teaching team head to Texas!

Dallas’ Park Cities Pet Sitter, Inc. Will Have Newest Sitter Staff Certified in Pet First Aid and CPR in November

Dallas, TX (PRWEB) October 14, 2013pet first aid training with Arden Moore

Park Cities Pet Sitter President, Joette White, believes having the best trained sitters possible is the key to her business’ success and longevity. Part of this training includes having her pet sitters trained in pet first aid and CPR. Ms. White’s newest pet sitters will undergo Pet Tech First Aid/CPR training on November 10th to receive certification on the latest pet first aid and CPR protocols. The certification class will cover things like pet restraining and muzzling, choking management, fracture/bleeding protocols, care for heatstroke and frostbite, poisoning, seizures and other emergency management techniques.

Ms. White says that having her pet sitters certified in pet first aid and CPR helps set Park Cities Pet Sitter apart from other pet sitting companies, and gives her clients additional peace of mind. “Park Cities Pet Sitter clients really treat their pets like family members; and while no one likes to think about potential emergencies, they do occasionally happen. This is why we have our pet sitters trained in pet first aid/CPR protocols, because the health and safety of our clients’ pets is our number one priority.”

The Pet Tech First Aid/CPR training will be given by Pet Tech Master Trainer, Arden Moore. Ms. Moore is a unique instructor in that she brings her own household pets, dog Chipper and cat Zeki, as live test subjects for the training. In addition to her Pet Tech Master Trainer status, Ms. Moore is a pet behavior consultant, best-selling author of 24 pet books, and the host of the No. 1 pet podcast: the Oh Behave Show on PetLifeRadio.com.

Though the November 10th training class is for Park Cities Pet Sitter employees only, Ms. Moore is also offering two additional pet first aid/CPR training classes that are open to the public. The first is on Sunday, November 3rd from 9:30am-2:30pm at the Sheraton DFW Airport Hotel, located at 4440 W. John Carpenter Freeway in Irving, TX. The second open-to-the-public class will be offered on Monday, November 11th from 9am-3:30pm at the SPCA of Texas, located at 2400 Lone Star Drive in Dallas, TX. The fee to join either training class is $99, and that covers all course materials and an official two-year certification.

Pre-registration and payment is required to secure a spot in either the November 3rd or November 11th class. To sign up for either class, go to http://www.petfirstaid4u.com/schedule, and click on the PayPal BUY NOW button for the preferred class date.

Park Cities Pet Sitter, Inc. has served the Dallas area 7 days a week, 365 days a year since 1992. Pet sitting, daily dog walks, pet taxis, overnight sitting, pet supply shopping, litter box cleaning and dog training are all services PCPSI offers. Park Cities Pet Sitter, Inc. is bonded and insured, and all sitters are employees–not independent contractors. A manager is on-call 24 hours a day to handle any emergencies. Additional information about Park Cities Pet Sitter can be found on their website at http://www.pcpsi.com.

ARDEN MOORE — Founder of Four Legged Life.com and creator of National Dog Party Day, Arden Moore is known as The Pawsitive Coach™. She is an animal behavior consultant, best-selling author, professional speaker, media consultant and certified pet first aid master instructor. She has authored 24 pet books. Each week, she hosts A-list celebrities and top pet newsmakers on her Oh Behave! Show on Pet Life Radio.com, drawing more than 800,000 loyal listeners. She shares her Oceanside, Calif. home with rescue dogs, Chipper and Cleo, cats, Murphy and Zeki and an overworked vacuum cleaner. To learn more, please visit http://www.fourleggedlife.com.

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/10/prweb11224796.htm

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Surfing Safely with Cleo, the 12-pound Mutt

I woke up yesterday all excited about entering Cleo, my 12-pound mutt, in the annual Loews Surf Competition staged at Imperial Beach, CA. Despite her size, she is a gutsy dog who loves, loves, loves to ride in waves on her surfboard. She is a proud member of the So Cal Surf Dogs. SurfBestPic62213-300x246

However, the waves were nasty and menacing at the event and there was also a strong current that was clipping photographers to their knees in the surf.  And, one 90-pound dog named Bodie, suffered a severe swollen back leg after his surfboard soared high in the air and landed on him, causing him to yelp in pain. As a master certified pet first aid instructor with Pet Tech, I was able to assess Bodie, wrap his leg in an iced bandana and help carry him into his vehicle so his pet parents, Kristi and Mark Jagger could take him to their veterinarian. Fortunately, no broken bones! (Learn more by visiting my pet first aid site: www.petfirstaid4u.com and I hope to see you in an upcoming class!)

I, like many people with small dogs, opted to withdraw from competition for safety reasons.  If the waves could hurt a big dog like Bodie, there was no way I was going to risk injury to little Cleo.  So, since my sister, Karen and nephew, Andy were visiting from Indiana, we went with Plan B:  we drove up I-5 to Ocean Beach Dog Beach were the waves were much calmer.  Here is a very happy Cleo catching a wave there.

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Zeki the Cool Cat’s Best Pals Woof

zeki2I’ve had many cats in my life. Growing up in Crown Point, Indiana, I had a Siamese named Corky who would swim in our backyard lake and follow anyone with a fishing pole in hopes of garnering a bluegill snack. My senior cat, Murphy (now 14) is the only cat I know who will come when you whistle the Jeopardy theme song.

But I have never met a cat so calm and content — and cool — to be a feline as Zeki. Zeki’s beginnings as a stray were scary. On a Fourth of July a few years ago in Dallas, she was a hungry stray. She made the near-fatal mistake of coming up to a man in hopes of scoring a treat. Instead, he took his hunting knife and skinned her back before she managed to wiggle free and scoot under a porch. Kind neighbors heard her cries of pain and rushed her to the veterinary clinic where she underwent extensive treatment, far too many sutures and water therapy.

Zeki was fostered by my friend, Dusty Rainbolt who knew that this white cat with distinctive gray markings would be a good match in my household — and my heart. She was right.

Today, Zeki is about 4 years old. She is very social, quite confident and has yet to meet a stranger or feel like she is in a strange place. She travels with me all over the country as Pet Tech’s first official feline teaching assistant. I am a master certified pet first aid/CPR instructor and Zeki (and often my dog, Chipper) come to class to give students opportunities for hands-on skills on a pair of very tolerant teaching assistants who just happen to wag tails and purr.  If you are interested in taking one of my classes, learn more by visiting my Pet First Aid 4 U site.

And, of course, she has her own Facebook page — Zeki the Cool Cat – and we invite you to join and catch her latest feline escapade.

Recently, Zeki became certified as a therapy cat with Pet Partners (formerly known as Delta Society) and our goal is to have her visit VA hospitals and reading programs in schools.

But one of her uncanny traits is her ability to make friends with dogs. She has this energy I suspect that she emits to dogs to let them know she is not a fraidy cat and that she likes them. She has canine pals who are Great Danes, pit bulls, poodles and even itty-bitty Chihuahuas.

Need proof? Here is a recent photo taken in my backyard of Zeki hanging with her ‘pup posse’ that consists of my dogs, Chipper and Cleo and our neighbor pals, Stanley and Buddy.  Zeki is working hard to debunk that notion that they ‘fight like cats and dogs.”

Do you have a cat who really digs dogs? Please share your feline tale!

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Catster Features Zeki the Cool Cat's Tale from Abused to Ambassa-Cat – Me-WOW!

Yes, I did take my cat, Zeki, with me to Los Angeles recently where I was a presenter at the Cat Writers Association conference. I had to. Zeki is my co-presenter and a true travel kitty. As this story written by Catster’s Monique Balas depicts, Zeki’s young life was horrific. But she is now the first feline teaching assistant in pet first aid with Pet Tech, the world’s No. 1 hands-on pet first aid program.

Every day, Zeki continues to amaze me with her ability to not let the horrible past consume her present state of mind. She is a spunky survivor blessed with a can-do attitude and plenty of feline charm for people, cats and even dogs.

Please enjoy this profile on Zeki and share it with your pet pals. And, be sure to become a Facebook fan of Zeki — click here! Learn more about Zeki’s pet first aid role by visiting Pet First Aid 4 U.

http://www.catster.com/lifestyle/cat-rescue-zeki-arden-moore

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